Removing 482 grams from each breast?

I am 5' 6 1/2 inches tall. I weigh 175 pounds and am a size 10/12. My bra size is a 38 DD or DDD depending upon the bra. My insurance company just approved a breast reduction requiring to take out more tissue (482 grams) than what my surgeon suggested (300 grams). I am nervous that if he takes out the amount the insurance is requiring I will have little or no breast. I do want and need a reduction, but I do not feel that 482 grams each is necessary. From what I am reading on the internet that equates to about a pound from each. I have been told that I have dense breast, which is why I have to have breast sono's done in addition to my yearly mamos. What size cup will I be? If the surgeon does not take out exactly what the insurance company wants, will they absolutely not cover the cost? Also, when they way the tissue, does that include any excess skin or fat from the sides? Thanks!

Definitely a sticky problem. 482 grams is around the size of a box of butter (four sticks). You have to decide on your goals. Then speak again with your surgeon. There is no way any of us can tell you your final cup size. The weight does include all tissue, skin and sometimes aspirate removed (this varies by insurer). You should go into the surgery knowing if your surgeon will removed the recommended amount by the insurance company. If you only wish the amount removed to fit your goals and that does not meet weight, then you will most likely be liable for the cost of the surgery.

Roberta L. Gartside MD
Roberta L. Gartside MD
1800 Town Center PkwyRestonVA20190US

Roberta L. Gartside MD

1800 Town Center Parkway, Suite 412, Reston,
VA, 22090, US

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You are correct that 482 grams is about 1 pound. Without examining you, it is difficult to determine what size your breasts will be after such a reduction. I recommend seeking a second opinion. If the surgeon does not remove this amount, then yes, the insurance company can deny payment of all costs, including anesthesia and facility fees. And, at least in my practice, all the excess skin and fat I remove from the axillary area is included in the breast reduction weight.

Thanks for the question,

Dr. Luong

Jacqueline A. Luong MD
Jacqueline A. Luong MD
6545 France Ave SEdinaMN55435US

Jacqueline A. Luong MD

6545 France Avenue S., Suite 350, Edina, MN,
55435, US

Thank you for your question. I would probably go with what your plastic surgeon recommends. Specifically ask him or her what your goals are. The insurance has pre determined amount that they wlll approve regarding your height and weight but they do not have any aesthetic "value." Discuss other options with your plastic surgeon or if unsure seek a 2nd opinion with another board certified plastic surgeon. With the absence of pictures and a physical exam I cannot make any reccommendations as to size or tisse to remove.

Good luck

Andres G. Sarraga, MD
Andres G. Sarraga, MD
21110 Biscayne BlvdAventuraFL33180US

Andres G. Sarraga, MD

21110 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 103, Miami, FL,
33180, US

Unfortunately this is becoming all to common. It is completely immoral and unethical for insurance companies to dictate their policies based on arbitrary numbers. You and your plastic surgeon will have to determine whether playing by their rules jeopardizes your aesthetic outcome. If so, you will have to pay for the procedure out of pocket.

Clark F Schierle MD, PhD
Clark F Schierle MD, PhD
676 N St Clair StChicagoIL60611US

Clark F Schierle MD, PhD

676 N Saint Clair St #1575, Chicago, IL,
60611, USA

It is unfortunate that insurance companies have these strict guidelines for covering breast reductions. It sometimes places plastic surgeons and patients in a difficult position between the best aesthetic result and getting insurance coverage for the procedure. Every insurance company and every policy has different requirements, policies, rules and procedures so you should definitely ask these questions of your insurance company. It is often the case that the procedure will not be covered in the event that less than the minimum required tissue is removed. In fairness to the insurance company this is meant to ensure that breast lifts for primarily aesthetic reasons are not left to be paid for by the insurance company. On the flip side, the amount to be removed cannot always be predicted and will frequently be more or less than the amount originally expected. The good news is that 482 grams of tissue is not a very large amount and might be a reasonable amount to remove in your procedure. I would recommend speaking with your insurance company about their policies as well as with your surgeon to review your mutual expectations. I wish you the best of luck and the best of results!

I hope this helps! You can find more tips and useful information in my Intsagram profile @plasticsurgerytruths

Adam J. Rubinstein MD
Adam J. Rubinstein MD
19495 Biscayne BlvdMiamiFL33180US

Adam J. Rubinstein MD

2999 NE 191st St., Penthouse 6, Miami, FL,
33180, US

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