Subglandular implant

Hello Dear Dr.

Is it possible to have subglandular implant when I want to change A-cup to B-cup (estimated implant volume 250-270 cc ) ?

As I know sub glandular technique has more natural look results

Looking forward for your reply

Thank you for your question. The option for subglandular implants largely depends on whether you have enough soft tissue coverage on your chest (upper part) so that the implant isn't visible. The other factors deciding pocket location include the patient's preference and the surgeon's expertise and experience. Both submuscular and subglandular can create a natural look and there are several plastic surgery studies that demonstrate this. In these studies, when evaluating photos, patients and surgeons alike are unable to correctly identify whether the implants are submuscular or subglandular. It is important to do your research and meet with a board-certified plastic surgeon to discuss your goals and concerns in detail.

Katerina M. Gallus, MD, FACS
Katerina M. Gallus, MD, FACS
8899 University Center LnSan DiegoCA92122US

Katerina M. Gallus, MD, FACS

8899 University Center Lane, Suite 200,
San Diego, CA, 92122, US

View

I'm not sure where you got the idea that subglandular is 'more natural' as that is not a true statement. Regardless, implant pocket should be your choice after being fully informed of the risks and benefits of each as submuscular pockets do have more benefits to them, especially for the diminished risk of capsular contractures. Implants put above the muscle (subglandular) tend to become rocks in socks as time goes on... in fact a surgeon in my locality has earned the reputation for last name balls. When my patients want above the muscle, I do recommend the textured anatomic implant (which is now implicated in increasing your risks for developing anaplastic large cell lymphoma ALCL - one manufacturer) to help better preserve the outcome to avoid the rock in the sock look. So discuss with your surgeon, ask your surgeon to remove their biases, and then choose what is best for you.

Curtis S. F. Wong MD
Curtis S. F. Wong MD
1950 Rosaline AveReddingCA96001US

Curtis S. F. Wong MD

1950 Rosaline Avenue, Suite F, Redding, CA,
96001, US

It is certainly possible to have an implant exchange and have the implant placed the sub glandular space if you meet the criteria. One of the most important criteria is that you need at least 1.5 cm of tissue at the upper aspect of your breast to camouflage the implant.

Earl Stephenson, Jr., M.D.
Earl Stephenson, Jr., M.D.
2220 Wisteria Dr SWSnellvilleGA30078US

Earl Stephenson, Jr., M.D.

2220 Wisteria Drive, Suite 209, Snellville,
GA, 30078, US

Thank you for your question - this comes up all the time during consultations. The decision making process for placing an implant in the subglandular versus the submuscular position has many variables. The biggest consideration is having enough tissue thickness to give the natural look that you are trying to achieve. If your tissue is thick enough, a subglandular pocket can be considered. If you are thinner, placing the implant below the muscle will help smooth the upper border of the implant and give a very pleasing appearance. It is always best to partner with a board-certified plastic surgeon in your area who has experience in aesthetic breast surgery and develop a surgical plan that is individualized to your specific body type and needs. Best wishes on a great result!

Trent D. Douglas, MD
Trent D. Douglas, MD
8899 University Center LnSan DiegoCA92122US

Trent D. Douglas, MD

8899 University Center Lane, Suite 200,
San Diego, CA, 92122, US

View

Yes it possible to place an implant subglandular. However, depending on how much breast tissue you already have to cover it , it may or may not look more natural than going below the muscle.. It's best to be evaluated then discuss with your plastic surgeon the pros and cons of each approach.

Adam Hamawy, MD
Adam Hamawy, MD
106 Stanhope StPrincetonNJ08540US

Adam Hamawy, MD

106 Stanhope Street, Princeton, NJ, 08540,
US

It really will depend on the thickness of your tissue If there is enough tissue thickness to help cover the width of the implant then it can be considered.

Robert Whitfield MD, FACS
Robert Whitfield MD, FACS
7200 Wyoming Springs DrRound RockTX78681US

Robert Whitfield MD, FACS

7200 Wyoming Springs, Suite 1400,
Round Rock, TX, 78761, US

View