Time off after breast reduction

I am a 30 yr old with 38h cup. I work in a high volume automotive production plant doing manual labour, including heavy lifting, extensive reaching, and heavy pushing/pulling and am planning on a reduction. Most answers I've seen regarding how long to take off of work don't answer that question in relation to what I do. So my question is how long would be adequate healing time for me to be able to back to work in the industry I work in?

If you had a relatively sedentary job, I would have recommended 1 - 2 weeks off (mostly to restore your stamina before going back to a full work day.)

But, in your case, with the relatively strenuous job you perform, frankly I would recommend 4 weeks off, in order to minimize risk of hurting yourself at work, which could further delay your total healing time. Not everyone can take that much time off work, but consultation with your plastic surgeon can fine-tune the best solution tailored just for you. Hope that helps!

Regina M. Nouhan MD
Regina M. Nouhan MD
4801 W 135th StLeawoodKS66224US

Regina M. Nouhan MD

4801 135th Street, Leawood, KS, 66224, US

After breast reduction, for patients who perform manual labor, it's best in my experience to take 3 weeks off.

Reza Momeni MD, FACS
Reza Momeni MD, FACS
1 Diamond Hill RdBerkeley HeightsNJ07922US

Reza Momeni MD, FACS

1 Diamond Hill Road, Berkeley Heights, NJ,
07922, US

Thank you for asking. Breast reduction patients may need 1-2 weeks off depending on how they feel and what type of activity is required at work. Many patients go back to light duty work after a few days. Heavy lifting or strenuous physical occupations may need adjustment and a little more time off on a case by case basis. See your local plastic surgeon who can evaluate your specific needs. Best wishes!

David C. Yao, M.D.
David C. Yao, M.D.
5010 E Shea BlvdScottsdaleAZ85254US

David C. Yao, M.D.

5010 E. Shea Blvd, Suite 175, Scottsdale,
AZ, 85254, US

I usually recommend 2 weeks off after such surgery. I generally see the patient's back prior to their return and then discuss their limitations. When I do the surgery, I do not injure or manipulate the underlying muscles at all so I do not limit patient's ability to lift their arms. Of course, follow the recommendations of your surgeon.

Good luck,

Dr. Luong

Jacqueline A. Luong MD
Jacqueline A. Luong MD
6545 France Ave SEdinaMN55435US

Jacqueline A. Luong MD

6545 France Avenue S., Suite 350, Edina, MN,
55435, US

Patients will typically have 1-2 days of pain, 1-2 weeks of soreness, and it will take 1-2 months to feel like you're back to 100%. In the last year, I have had an attorney who was able to work the next day (using her laptop from home, making conference calls, etc...) and a police officer who took a full six weeks of leave (because she can get kicked in the chest by a bad guy). Your surgeon should be able to work with you to help you and your employer understand any restrictions that may be specific to your line of work.

Clark F Schierle MD, PhD
Clark F Schierle MD, PhD
676 N St Clair StChicagoIL60611US

Clark F Schierle MD, PhD

676 N Saint Clair St #1575, Chicago, IL,
60611, USA

There will not be a specific answer per industry A benchmark of 6 weeks would be appropriate. Re-examination 1-2 weeks prior would determine if more time is necessary. Physical therapy would be part of the recovery process.

Robert Whitfield MD, FACS
Robert Whitfield MD, FACS
7200 Wyoming Springs DrRound RockTX78681US

Robert Whitfield MD, FACS

7200 Wyoming Springs, Suite 1400,
Round Rock, TX, 78761, US

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