Will I be able to breastfeed after a breast lift surgery?

I had a breast lift surgery in March 2007, with anchor cut and areola re-positioning but no implant. I'm expecting a baby next month. My breast reacts to the cold, stimulation and often gets painful a few days before my period starts. I would love to breastfeed my baby but can't help thinking that I might not be able to. I know sometimes it just doesn't work, but do you think that the type of surgery I had could severely prevent that?

Many thanks for your help.

Most patients who have breast lifts or breast augmentation procedures are able to breast feed. It's best to try it when the time comes; you will soon know whether you can or can't! Very extensive surgeries or very large implants tend to interfere with the ability to breast feed. Good luck with your pregnancy!

Brent Moelleken MD, FACS
Brent Moelleken MD, FACS
120 S Spalding DrBeverly HillsCA90212US

Brent Moelleken MD, FACS

120 S. Spalding Drive, Suite 110,
Beverly Hills, CA, 90212, US

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Hello, this is an important concern for you and others in your situation. You have experienced the benefit of a breast lift procedure. You should not feel bad about the decision you made back in 2007. Moving forward, the reality of you being able to breast feed now will be self evident. Given your question and it's emotional impact, hopefully you will be able to breast feed. If not, do not let this situation effect your bonding with your child nor your decision made many years ago.

Michael I. Kulick MD
Michael I. Kulick MD
450 Sutter StSFCA94108US

Michael I. Kulick MD

450 Sutter Street, Suite 2620,
San Francisco, CA, 94108, US

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This is a great question that comes up a lot. The short answer is, you probably will be able to breastfeed. I'm not aware of any studies looking at breast feeding after a breast lift, but there is one that looks at breastfeeding after breast reduction. In that study the chances of being able to breastfeed are about 50%. After having a breast reduction one third of the women studied were able to breastfeed, one third were not, and one third did not try. A breast reduction is more invasive than a breast lift and removes significant amounts of glandular tissue. Theoretically, breast reduction is more likely to affect breastfeeding than a breast lift where much less (if any) breast tissue is removed. Overall about 85% of women should be able to breastfeed. If this is your first child you may not know if you're able to breastfeed in general, though it is more likely that you can. So, chances are in your favor that you will be able to breastfeed your baby.

I will post a video about this question in Instagram. You can see it along with others you might like by checking out @plasticsurgerytruths

I hope this helps!

Adam J. Rubinstein MD
Adam J. Rubinstein MD
19495 Biscayne BlvdMiamiFL33180US

Adam J. Rubinstein MD

2999 NE 191st St., Penthouse 6, Miami, FL,
33180, US

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Breast lift surgery does not usually prevent or limit breast feeding ability. Of course, it depends on the technique used, but usually there is no impact on ability to breastfeed. I always tell my patients, If you could breastfeed prior to your lift, you should be able to breastfeed after your lift. However, if you have never breastfed, then we don't know that you can. There is a small percentage of american women who have never had any surgery on their breast, but still cannot breastfeed.

Breastfeeding is great for your baby, so hopefully you won't have any problems.

I wish you best of luck!

Dr Markmann

Daniel Markmann MD
Daniel Markmann MD
9171 Baltimore National PikeEllicott CityMD21042US

Daniel Markmann MD

9171 Baltimore National Pike, Suite 205,
Ellicott City, MD, 21042, US

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Breast augmentation, lift, and reduction are all designed to allow safe breast feeding. Many women have difficulty breast feeding without surgery, statistically the surgery does not affect the success rate.

Clark F Schierle MD, PhD
Clark F Schierle MD, PhD
676 N St Clair StChicagoIL60611US

Clark F Schierle MD, PhD

676 N Saint Clair St #1575, Chicago, IL,
60611, USA

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Patients who have had breast lift and reduction surgery have gone on to breast feed. Like you have already pointed out women in certain instances cannot breast feed for a variety of reasons. The most common is typically not enough milk production.

Robert Whitfield MD, FACS
Robert Whitfield MD, FACS
1510 W 34th StAustinTX78703US

Robert Whitfield MD, FACS

1510 W. 34th Street, Suite 100, Austin, TX,
78703, US

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