Will Google Glass make its way into the operating room?

Will Google Glass make its way into the operating room?
via @googleglassfans

A number of plastic surgeons have adopted wearable devices, 3-D technology and robotic assistants while working with patients, but will Google Glass affect the way medical professionals communicate with patients or conduct their surgeries?

At the 2014 Aesthetic Meeting in San Francisco, The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery announced a number of advancements that would impact the realm of cosmetic surgery in the future. Google Glass was featured for the ways it could affect plastic surgery not only in the operating room, but during patient consultations as well.

While the device is not yet available for public purchase, a select group of people have had the ability to test drive the technology to view how it may improve their occupations. There are a number of ways surgeons have used this technology in their practices, ranging from using the device to conduct research in the office to conferencing with other surgeons from around the world. The New York Post reported on one doctor who used the glasses during surgery, live-streaming the event for medical students, taking pictures and pulling up medical records without having to use his hands.

"Every day, I come up with new uses," he said to the source. "We showed on a big-screen TV ... the inside of someone's nose and their crooked septum and clogged sinuses." 

In addition, he offered patients the option to view their surgeries once they're completed. Some people may not want to view the plastic surgery process from the point of view of their doctors, but those who are intrigued may have the ability to see themselves under the knife. 

Another California-based surgeon explained to Bakersfield Now that he uses Google Glass to consult with other surgeons in his firm, which allows them to provide patients with the best quality service possible.