Breast Implant Size Reduction on the Rise: They Don't Need to be Bigger to be Better - Healthy is the New Ideal

Breast Implant Size Reduction on the Rise: They Don't Need to be Bigger to be Better - Healthy is the New Ideal
Breast Implant Size Reduction on the Rise: They Don't Need to be Bigger to be Better - Healthy is the New Ideal

Cosmetic surgery provides us with options and at least some degree of control when it comes to the shape of our body.

Breast implants have been popular for decades… with countless women seeking to enhance their bustline through augmentation. Even just a few years ago, mega-cleavage and a bolstered bosom were in. The pervasive and popular mindset being, bigger is better, has persisted for ages, with celebrities trading in demure décolletage for a strikingly curvaceous silhouette. The tides seem to be turning however – and while breast augmentation is still popular, if not more popular than ever, it seems that most women recognize that excessively large breasts can be a bit of a drag.

Extra-large breasts can pose a whole array of problems. Bra straps can cut into the shoulders, leave unsightly marks and cause general discomfort. A petite body carrying disproportionately large breasts can make shopping a seemingly insurmountable challenge – and don’t even get started when it comes to exercise. Suddenly, what should be a relaxing run on a treadmill can feel like an awkward uphill battle.

Today however, it appears that some women who went quite big a few years ago are ready to pare down their enhanced cup size or return to a natural state. Britain's Victoria Beckham and Katie Price come to mind.

Beyond an individual’s battle with gravitational forces, I think, societally, this wave has been ushered in because we've matured culturally, heralding different shapes and sizes as beautiful, and doing away with antiquated "Barbie" stereotypes of beauty. I say this mind you, as a blonde, thin female who didn't suffer for that beauty ideal… but thank goodness it's changed. Breast sizes don't need to be bigger to be better. Extremes aren't so attractive. Healthy is the new ideal. Proportionate is pretty!

Now that we've seen the tide turn from over-the-top to realistic in terms of celebrity breast implants, many may be considering a breast implant size reduction for themselves. If so, here's some information to consider:

  • Your surgeon will need to have the surgical details of your first breast surgery.
  • A perk of exchanging large implants for a perkier alternative is that often a surgeon can use the same incision point as was used in the enhancement to remove and replace with the new, smaller implant. (Couldn’t resist a pun.)
  • Exchanging for smaller implants may necessitate sutures to surgically reduce the size of the pocket so that they fit properly.
  • According to board-certified plastic surgeon, Gary R. Culbertson, M.D, for the skin to adjust to the decrease in size- either to a smaller implant or no implant- a breast lift or mastopexy may be performed during the reduction surgery.
  • Additionally, Robert T. Buchanan, M.D, a board-certified surgeon, says that the decision for a breast lift can wait until after the surgery to see how the skin adjusts, using tape and a bra during the healing to keep skin in place. He stresses that this should be discussed with your plastic surgeon prior to your procedure.

For more information on breast reduction and breast revision explore the procedures page.

To find a board-certified surgeon and breast specialist in your area use the Smart beauty Guide search tool to ensure that you are receiving the best expert care.

About the Author

Mary Cunningham is a health and wellness writer and co-founder of the lifestyle site, Girl Around Town and travels regularly between New York, Austin and Houston. She loves speaking about the beauty we have inside and how to do the inner work to let that beauty radiate. Prior to leaving the corporate world to start her own company, Mary worked at the GRAMMYs in Los Angeles, before moving to Manhattan, where she joined Nokia's Digital Music Department.